Nice things of the week: Major Lazer toy, Al Fingers Cards & A Social History of Jamaican Album Covers.

posted on August 6th, 2011 by in Audio, Design

Super Cat / Major Lazer / Al Fingers

Yes people. Here some thingies we liked pon the Internets these days:

Major Lazer: Kaiju Comic-Con Edition
Major Lazer is was available as a plastic toy figure at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con and in the Major Lazer online store. Design by Ferry Gouw.

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Download Major Lazer’s When You Hear The Bassdrum (Stereotype Angry Remix)

Al Fingers Limited Edition Business Cards
The man Al Fingers has new business cards featuring 7″ vinyl imagery. Each card is unique, featuring its own design.

All you need to do to claim your free business card is work with Al Fingers. It’s that simple. Just commission Al for a highly paid project and get your one-of-a-kind card, free of charge!

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Download Al Fingers’ Katy Perry – California Gurls (Black And Yellow Refix)

Smashing Magazine: A Social History Of Jamaican Album Covers

For many people, this vision – of roots reggae and its deified lead singer – is the only face that Jamaican music has to offer. (To be honest, the Jamaican music industry, in its eagerness to capitalize on the popularity of this face, hasn’t done much to contradict it.)

Dig a little deeper, however, and you’ll find a dozen genres lurking beneath the tie-died surface of roots reggae. On the album covers belonging to these genres, moreover, you’ll find a dozen different – and sometimes contradictory – visual images of what it has meant to be Jamaican, besides the template of the righteous Rastafarian popularized by Bob Marley. Although the reggae of the 1970s popularized a message of political rebellion, you only have to go back a few years earlier to find album covers that unconsciously reflect the values of neocolonialism – Jamaica as cultural treasure chest waiting to be looted by foreign interests.

Read the whole article.